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Food Safety

Real Dirt on Clean Water

Everyone knows that water is essential to life. But what’s coming out of your tap or bottle may not really be your healthiest choice.

Sure, your water may look clean but is it?

Fountain and Lights by Elise Hearn

Fountain and Lights by Elise Hearn

Most people think that governmental agencies ensure that our water’s clean. And while the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the Clean Water Act to safeguard our water supply, it only set standards and testing requirements in our municipal water treatment facilities for 114 different contaminants out of literally hundreds more.

In fact, the Environmental Working Group obtained test results from a database of over 20 million records from state water officials to determine the quality of drinking water in 45 states. The results revealed 316 contaminants were present in our water supplies. Among them were 202 chemicals that aren’t regulated by any safe water standards.i

Checking the quality of your local water is easy to do. Just visit the National Drinking Water Database.

So yes, your water looks clean. But really, it’s not.

Why Filtration?

The simple answer? You either use a filter or you are the filter.

Only 2% of all treated water is used for drinking water. The rest is used on your lawn, shower, laundry, or used for farms or industry. It’s simply too time-consuming and expensive to test and remove the thousands of chemicals that may be present in any particular water source.

And even if your water was perfectly clean before it left your municipality, it still has miles to travel in pipes before it gets to your home. Who knows what it runs into along the way?

What are you really drinking?

Here’s what may be in your water, and some of its hazardous effects:

Industrial Pollutants (such as benzene, nitrates, and petrochemicals): Long-term exposure may cause increased risk of cancer, as well as blood, nervous system, kidney, and liver problems.

Agricultural Pollutants (pesticides such as atrazine, lindane, alachlor, and others): Long-term exposure may cause increased risk of cancer, as well as eye, liver, kidney, spleen, blood, and nervous system problems.

Heavy Metals (such as lead, copper, mercury, arsenic, and cadmium): Even at low levels, long-term exposure may cause behavioral problems and learning disabilities. The EPA estimates that between 10 and 20% of total lead exposure in young children comes from drinking water.ii

Disinfection By-products (such as: trihalomethanes, chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane,and bromoform): Long-term exposure may cause increased risk of cancer, as well as liver, kidney, or central nWater Bottlesrvous system problems.

With all these problems with tap water, you might think that bottled water is the answer—but you’re wrong. What most people don’t know is that there’re no regulations regarding the quality of bottled water. That’s right, none. Bottling companies don’t even have the same regulations to follow that your local municipal water supply does. That means that despite the clean look of your bottle, in many cases the water it contains isn’t any better than tap water.

The bottom line is that you can’t control what happens to your water before it gets to your house. But you can control what happens after. If you want to make sure you have r

Get Clean Water

Get Clean Water

eally clean drinking water, you really have to use a filter—a good one.

Why Get Clean® Water?

Because it’s safe, powerful, green and smart—and it outperforms both Brita® and PUR®*, hands-down:

Safe:  It reduces 59 harmful contaminants—at least 21 of which Brita doesn’t even touch—including up to 99% of water-borne lead.

Powerful:   It’s incredibly thrifty, delivering over 80 gallons of purer water from every hardworking, environmentally friendly filter—twice as much as big-name brands—for just a little over a penny per glass**.

Green:   It uses a unique refillable filter system, so there’s less waste in landfills.†

Smart:   It features a convenient smart-meter that shows you exactly when to replace your filter, so there’s no more guessing. And on top of all that, it’s ‘Gold Seal’ certified to tough ANSI/NSF Standards 42 and 53 by the Water Quality Association (WQA).

Ready to feel better with good Clean Water?  Visit my site  Elise.MyShaklee.com for purchasing options and more information!  Good health is a choice we make all through the day, make Shaklee Products part of those choices. Stay Well! Elise

i http://www.ewg.org/tap-water/executive-summary.php

ii http://water.epa.gov/drink/info/lead/lead1.cfm

* Comparison of current WQA and NSF certified reduction claims conduced on May 26, 2011, referencing Brita® pitchers using OB03 cartridge and PUR® pitchers using CFR-950Z cartridge and is valid only for the named products marketed at that time. Product data claims obtained from the NSF and WQA website certification listings. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. “Big name brands” defined as Brita and Pur.

** Compared to Brita and Pur pitcher filters at 40 gallons.

† Compared to traditional carbon production.

Source: Shaklee Corporation 04/10/13

Mysteries of Your Refrigerator

If you are like me, then you know what I mean when I refer to those mysterious plastic containers that live in the back of your refrigerator!  We all seem to collect them for some reason, even though I have clear glass containers with snap-on seals.  Sigh… we have to get a handle on these boxes and discard them.  Life forms from not so healthy

Vegetables

strains of who-knows-what could be living in your refrigerator right now.

Refrigerators are convenient since they allow us to store foods at the proper temperatures and humidities.  Keeping your refrigerator at 40degrees Fahrenheit will keep bacteria from growing on your food.  According to the USDA FactSheet on Refrigeration, ” Bacteria exist everywhere in nature. They are in the soil, air, water, and the foods we eat. When they have nutrients (food), moisture, and favorable temperatures, they grow rapidly, increasing in numbers to the point where some types of bacteria can cause illness. Bacteria grow most rapidly in the range of temperatures between 40 and 140 °F, the “Danger Zone,” some doubling in number in as little as 20 minutes. A refrigerator set at 40 °F or below will protect most foods.”

The doors of newer refrigerators are made with all kinds of storage.  However, every time the door is open, these shelves are blasted with the warm air of the house! So place more stable items on these shelves such as condiments, not leftovers or beverages such as milk. 

Put milk and raw meat (well packaged) on the shelves close to the freezer unit or in the coldest part of the refrigerator.   Store raw meat in covered containers such as glass, and no more than a few days.  Below is a list from the USDA concerning food storage times so you and your family will stay healthier.  Don’t waste food and money by improperly storing your food!

From USDA site

www.fsis.usda.gov/FACTSheets/Refrigeration_&_Food_Safety/index.asp

Storage Times For Refrigerated Foods
Ground Meat, Ground Poultry, and Stew Meat
Ground beef, turkey, veal, pork, lamb 1-2 days
Stew meats 1-2 days
Fresh Meat (Beef, Veal, Lamb, and Pork)
Steaks, chops, roasts 3-5 days
Variety meats (Tongue, kidneys, liver, heart, chitterlings) 1-2 days
Fresh Poultry 
Chicken or turkey, whole 1-2 days
Chicken or turkey, parts 1-2 days
Giblets 1-2 days
Bacon and Sausage 
Bacon 7 days
Sausage, raw from meat or poultry 1-2 days
Smoked breakfast links, patties 7 days
Summer sausage labeled “Keep Refrigerated” Unopened, 3 months;
Opened, 3 weeks
Hard sausage (such as Pepperoni) 2-3 weeks
Ham, Corned Beef
Ham, canned, labeled “Keep Refrigerated” Unopened, 6-9 months;
Opened, 3-5 days
Ham, fully cooked, whole 7 days
Ham, fully cooked, half 3-5 days
Ham, fully cooked, slices 3-4 days
Corned beef in pouch with pickling juices 5-7 days
Hot Dogs and Luncheon Meats 
Hot dogs Unopened package, 2 weeks;
Opened package, 1 week
Luncheon meats Unopened package, 2 weeks;
Opened package, 3-5 days
Deli and Vacuum-Packed Products
Store-prepared (or homemade) egg, chicken, tuna, ham, and macaroni salads 3-5 days
Pre-stuffed pork, lamb chops, and chicken breasts 1 day
Store-cooked dinners and entrees 3-4 days
Commercial brand vacuum-packed dinners with/USDA seal, unopened 2 weeks
Cooked Meat, Poultry, and Fish Leftovers 
Pieces and cooked casseroles 3-4 days
Gravy and broth, patties, and nuggets 3-4 days
Soups and Stews 3-4 days
Fresh Fish and Shellfish
Fresh Fish and Shellfish 1-2 days
Eggs 
Fresh, in shell 3-5 weeks
Raw yolks, whites 2-4 days
Hard-cooked 1 week
Liquid pasteurized eggs, egg substitutes Unopened, 10 days;
Opened, 3 days
Cooked egg dishes 3-4 days


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