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November, 2009:

Just how much Protein do We Need?


Eating Healthy is Our Choice

As we enter the holiday season, we will be presented with many opportunities to eat things that are not healthy for us.  Yes they taste good, but our body does not always need or process these “foods” really well.  We have been talking about Protein in several previous posts and in this post we will get ideas on how much Protein we need each day.

“Although no one-size-fits-all answer exists for that question and research on the topic is still emerging, the current recommended dietary allowance for protein is 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight per day for healthy young adults. That comes to about 62 grams of protein a day for a person who weighs 170 pounds. Although growing children, pregnant women, nursing mothers, and older adults may need a little more (1.0–1.3 grams per kilogram of body weight), getting the minimum daily requirement of protein is fairly easy. Cereal with milk for breakfast, a peanut butter and jelly sandwich for lunch, and a piece of fish with a side of beans for dinner adds up to about 70 grams of protein.

It’s also important to pay attention to what comes along with the protein in your food choices. An eight-ounce broiled porterhouse steak is a great source of complete protein—54 grams worth. But it also delivers 44 grams of fat, 16 of which are saturated. Saturated fats raise blood cholesterol, and high blood cholesterol increases the risk of heart disease. On the other hand, a cup of cooked lentils has 18 grams of protein, but less than one gram of fat.

Vegetable sources of protein, including soy protein beverage mixes, are also an excellent choice and many also provide healthful amounts of other essential nutrients such as fiber, vitamins, and minerals. The best animal protein choices are fish and poultry. If you are partial to red meat, such as beef, pork, or lamb, stick with the leanest cuts, choose moderate portion sizes, and make it only an occasional part of your diet.”

Have fun during the Holiday Season, celebrate with family and friends and stay healthy at the same time! The choice is yours.  You Deserve Health!

Source:  Health Sciences Bulletin from Shaklee Corp.  2009

Atlantis Launch Successful!

IMG_2716 Shuttle over Bay Lake  2x 2 5  100 copy

Atlantis Space Shuttle over Bay Lake

I had the great privilege to observe the launch of the Atlantis Space Shuttle yesterday from Disney’s Contemporary Resort.  I was looking over Bay Lake at Walt Disney World and was thrilled to see the launch.  On time and looking amazing,  Atlantis made a fiery streak across the sky as it headed on its next mission.  Scheduled to have 3 space walks while delivering equipment and 2 control gyroscopes to the International Space Station.

One important item that is on the Shuttle Atlantis is a product from Shaklee Corporation called Astro-Ade, a special re-hydration product that was developed by Shaklee at NASA’s request in the early 1990’s.  Shaklee continues to support and research ways for all of us the be healthier each day.  For those sports enthusiasts, the upcoming Winter Olympics in Vancouver BC will be a time to see Shaklee Nutrition at work!  Having already powered 54 Olympic Gold Medals, we are ready for more Gold!

Protein and Weight Management

In our continuing study of the impact of Protein on our health we have learned that Protein is necessary since high-quality proteins provide enough of all the essential amino acids needed to support the body’s work. Lower quality proteins add these necessary building blocks for health.

“When most of us think about the health benefits of dietary protein, its role in bodybuilding comes to mind. No new body tissue can be built without it. However, research also suggests that the intake of high-quality protein in the context of an overall healthful diet may also have positive effects on our body weight and body composition as we age, as well as play a role in the prevention of chronic diseases such as heart disease, certain types of cancer, and osteoporosis.

Weight Management: Studies have shown that achieving a healthy weight and maintaining that weight can help add years to your life, and scientists believe that dietary protein may play an important role in weight management. High-protein diets may promote significantly more weight loss compared to lower protein diets because of protein’s role in promoting satiety. In a fairly recent study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers studied the effects of increasing dietary protein while maintaining carbohydrate content on weight loss, appetite, calorie intake, and fat mass in a small group of study participants.  Initially, participants were instructed to follow a weight-maintaining diet (50% carbohydrate, 15% protein, 35% fat) for two weeks. Then for the following two weeks, they were asked to follow a diet providing the same amount of calories but with 50% of calories coming from carbohydrate, 30% from protein, and 20% from fat. Two weeks later, they were given an ad libitum diet of 50% carbohydrate, 30% protein, and 20% fat to follow for an additional 12 weeks. Even though subjects could eat as much food as they wanted in those 12 weeks, they actually reduced their calorie intake by an average of 441 calories per day. They also lost an average of 10.8 pounds in body weight and 8.2 pounds of body fat.”

Cafe Late Cinch Shake

Cafe Late Cinch Shake

This is all good news to those of us who are concerned with our weight and want to have a positive impact on our continuing health.   Stay Well!

Protein’s Impact Continued

Last post we talked about how important Protein is for the human body.  This post continues with a look at how different sources of Protein differ and how they help our bodies stay healthy.

Foods provide about 20 different amino acids, of which more than half are considered to be “nonessential.” In other words, the body can make them for itself. However, nine other amino acids are considered “essential,” meaning the body is unable to make them on its own. And unlike the carbohydrates and fats we consume, amino acids are not stored in the body. Therefore, the body must rely on a constant and steady supply from the protein-rich foods we eat every day.

Cinch Snack Bars

Cinch Snack Bars

So what are the best sources of dietary protein? And is there a difference between animal and vegetable sources? Well, it’s true that not all dietary protein is created equal. It really is the protein quality of one’s diet that, in large part, determines how well a child will grow and develop and how well an adult will maintain his or her health. Put simply, high-quality proteins provide enough of all the essential amino acids needed to support the body’s work, and lower-quality proteins don’t. Two key factors that influence protein quality are the protein’s digestibility and its amino acid composition. Protein digestibility is a measure of the amount of amino acids absorbed from a given protein intake, and amino acid composition refers to the simultaneous availability of all the needed amino acids from a food we choose to eat. In general, animal-sourced proteins (meat, fish, poultry, eggs, and dairy) are considered high-quality proteins, as is soy, a vegetable-sourced protein. However, other vegetable proteins tend to be of much lower quality and are often referred to as “incomplete” proteins because they do not provide all the essential amino acids the body needs. Incomplete proteins can come from fruits, vegetables, grains, and nuts.

In the next post we will continue to explore Protein and how it impacts our body! Stay well!

This information comes from a Health Sciences Bulletin from Shaklee Corporation.

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