Elise Hearn's Blog Rotating Header Image

Mysteries of Your Refrigerator

If you are like me, then you know what I mean when I refer to those mysterious plastic containers that live in the back of your refrigerator!  We all seem to collect them for some reason, even though I have clear glass containers with snap-on seals.  Sigh… we have to get a handle on these boxes and discard them.  Life forms from not so healthy

Vegetables

strains of who-knows-what could be living in your refrigerator right now.

Refrigerators are convenient since they allow us to store foods at the proper temperatures and humidities.  Keeping your refrigerator at 40degrees Fahrenheit will keep bacteria from growing on your food.  According to the USDA FactSheet on Refrigeration, ” Bacteria exist everywhere in nature. They are in the soil, air, water, and the foods we eat. When they have nutrients (food), moisture, and favorable temperatures, they grow rapidly, increasing in numbers to the point where some types of bacteria can cause illness. Bacteria grow most rapidly in the range of temperatures between 40 and 140 °F, the “Danger Zone,” some doubling in number in as little as 20 minutes. A refrigerator set at 40 °F or below will protect most foods.”

The doors of newer refrigerators are made with all kinds of storage.  However, every time the door is open, these shelves are blasted with the warm air of the house! So place more stable items on these shelves such as condiments, not leftovers or beverages such as milk. 

Put milk and raw meat (well packaged) on the shelves close to the freezer unit or in the coldest part of the refrigerator.   Store raw meat in covered containers such as glass, and no more than a few days.  Below is a list from the USDA concerning food storage times so you and your family will stay healthier.  Don’t waste food and money by improperly storing your food!

From USDA site

www.fsis.usda.gov/FACTSheets/Refrigeration_&_Food_Safety/index.asp

Storage Times For Refrigerated Foods
Ground Meat, Ground Poultry, and Stew Meat
Ground beef, turkey, veal, pork, lamb 1-2 days
Stew meats 1-2 days
Fresh Meat (Beef, Veal, Lamb, and Pork)
Steaks, chops, roasts 3-5 days
Variety meats (Tongue, kidneys, liver, heart, chitterlings) 1-2 days
Fresh Poultry 
Chicken or turkey, whole 1-2 days
Chicken or turkey, parts 1-2 days
Giblets 1-2 days
Bacon and Sausage 
Bacon 7 days
Sausage, raw from meat or poultry 1-2 days
Smoked breakfast links, patties 7 days
Summer sausage labeled “Keep Refrigerated” Unopened, 3 months;
Opened, 3 weeks
Hard sausage (such as Pepperoni) 2-3 weeks
Ham, Corned Beef
Ham, canned, labeled “Keep Refrigerated” Unopened, 6-9 months;
Opened, 3-5 days
Ham, fully cooked, whole 7 days
Ham, fully cooked, half 3-5 days
Ham, fully cooked, slices 3-4 days
Corned beef in pouch with pickling juices 5-7 days
Hot Dogs and Luncheon Meats 
Hot dogs Unopened package, 2 weeks;
Opened package, 1 week
Luncheon meats Unopened package, 2 weeks;
Opened package, 3-5 days
Deli and Vacuum-Packed Products
Store-prepared (or homemade) egg, chicken, tuna, ham, and macaroni salads 3-5 days
Pre-stuffed pork, lamb chops, and chicken breasts 1 day
Store-cooked dinners and entrees 3-4 days
Commercial brand vacuum-packed dinners with/USDA seal, unopened 2 weeks
Cooked Meat, Poultry, and Fish Leftovers 
Pieces and cooked casseroles 3-4 days
Gravy and broth, patties, and nuggets 3-4 days
Soups and Stews 3-4 days
Fresh Fish and Shellfish
Fresh Fish and Shellfish 1-2 days
Eggs 
Fresh, in shell 3-5 weeks
Raw yolks, whites 2-4 days
Hard-cooked 1 week
Liquid pasteurized eggs, egg substitutes Unopened, 10 days;
Opened, 3 days
Cooked egg dishes 3-4 days


One Comment

  1. health says:

    We are very happy to be aware of this piece of writing

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

Leave a Reply

One more thing *

 Subscribe To Elise Hearn's Blog By Reader or Email

Elise Hearn's Blog is Stephen Fry proof thanks to caching by WP Super Cache